Oil may extend rally


Opec cuts, US sanctions will continue to impact crude supply in Q2

Oil prices, which gained 30 per cent on average in the first quarter of 2019, are expected to continue the rally in the second quarter and likely to trade mostly around $70 a barrel, according to industry analysts.

The first-quarter gain was the biggest quarterly rise in a decade, driven by the US sanctions on Iran and Venezuela as well as cuts by Opec and non-Opec members that were implemented in early January this year.

On Friday, the Brent rose 48 cents to settle at $67.59 a barrel while US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) futures rose 84 cents, or 1.42 per cent, to $60.14.

The oil price in the second quarter is expected to trade between $64 per barrel to $70 a barrel compared to $60 to $65 per barrel range forecast for the first quarter. Industry executives and analysts have put $67.4 a barrel median range for second quarter and as high as $80.

Oman’s Energy Minister Mohammed bin Hamad Al Rumhy on Saturday emphasised that the Sultante will remain committed to Opec agreement until the end of 2019. He predicted crude prices to trade in the range of $65 and $75 a barrel until the end of 2019.

With oil rig count falling and production remaining stagnate last week in the US while the Opec and non-Opec countries also reluctant to make up for the lost volume, the oil prices will rally further in the coming months. The other factors which will influence the oil price upward will be the US sanctions on Iran and Washington’s consistent pressure on traders to reduce their exposure to Venezuela.

“Oil price trend continued to remain upward during March 2019, showing consistent gains since the start of the year and closing little short of the $70 a barrel mark. However, prices are yet to see the peaks seen during October 2018,” said Faisal Hasan, head of investment research at Kamco. 

World oil demand is projected to rise from 99.02 million barrels per day in Q1 2019 to 99.21 million barrels per day in Q2 2019, keeping the oil prices steadily on the upward trend during second-quarter 2019.

Opec and Russia had cut oil production by 1.2 million barrels per day from January 2019 for an initial six months period, which was one of the main drivers for the surge in prices. Opec members agreed to cut 0.8 million while Russia had 0.4 million bpd cut.

Oil producers are planning to hold an ordinary meeting again in Vienna on June 25 and an extraordinary meeting on April 17-18. Reports said Saudi Arabia was trying to convince Russia to stay much longer in the pact of lower oil production, and Moscow may agree only to a three-month extension.

“Saudi Arabia, if necessary, will further reduce its production to balance oil supply and demand. Opec’s next meeting will be held by April 2019 and if Opec members and Russia agree on reduction oil production it can be expected that oil prices will increase,” said Omid Shokri Kalehsar, a Washington-based senior energy security analyst and visiting research scholar in the Schar, School of Policy and Government at George Mason University.

Kalehsar noted that the US is expected to extend waivers from Iran’s sanctions to several countries to prevent a sharp rise in oil prices. “If there is no major political tension in the oil producing region, a balance can be seen between and supply and demand by Q2 and there will be no major change in oil prices,” he said.

Meanwhile, reports said that the US has instructed oil trading houses and refiners to further cut dealings with Venezuela or face sanctions themselves, even if the trades are not prohibited by published US sanctions.

“With US sanctions taking Iranian and Venezuelan oil off the market, at the same time Opec and non-Opec producers want to see higher prices and are currently reluctant to make up for any lost volume,” said Andrew Lipow, president of Lipow Oil Associates in Houston.

In addition, the US energy firms last week reduced the number of oil rigs operating to their lowest in nearly a year, cutting the most rigs in a quarter in three years.

According to Baker Hughes, the total number of active oil drilling rigs fell by 8 to 816. Canada’s total oil and gas rig count fell by 17 and is now 88, which is 46 fewer rigs than this time last year.

Waheed Abbas/DubaiFiled on March 30, 2019 ,
https://www.khaleejtimes.com

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Qatar’s Withdrawal from OPEC not a Good Sign

 

As Qatar’s withdrawal from OPEC takes effect today, the geopolitics of energy is changing. Each major energy producer is trying to take more shares in the world energy market. Political tensions between major oil and gas producers would affect regional and world energy markets. As the world’s largest exporter of LNG, Qatar gets the most revenue from it.

U.S. sanctions against Iran give an opportunity to Saudi Arabia which can use its producing capacity to produce and export more oil in the region in an attempt to weaken Iran’s position in OPEC.

A high oil price is not good for major oil consumers. The world oil market has been worrying about U.S.’sanctions against Iran.Regional tensions are one of the factors affecting members of the international organization. The tensions between Qatar and Saudi Arabia, which began in June 2017, would prevent Qatar from withdrawing from Saudi Arabia’s shadow even in an organization like OPEC. Qatar with production of 0.6 million bpd is not a major actor among OPEC members.

 

After a sharp rise in the price of crude oil to more than 100 U.S. dollars between 2011 and 2012, the price of crude oil gradually shrank in 2016 and reached a low of less than 40 dollars. The organization was unable to find a solution for the crisis, which had a huge impact on its member states.

Oil producers were able to cut crude prices to 70 dollars a barrel in mid-2018 with a drop in supply. But once again the policy of the largest oil producer Saudi Arabia, along with the White House’s political and economic measures and the gap in the queue of supporters for a reduction in production, led to a sharp drop in crude oil to about 50 dollars.

In a situation where the future of oil demand is not clear in the long run, the market management method and the call for Russia to counterbalance the U.S. are also challenges to OPEC.

South Pars Gas field (North Dome) shared by Iran and Qatar is a major source of Qatar LNG production. It is the largest gas field in the world. Qatar has made it clear that by 2024 it would have used South Pars to produce 110 million tons per year.

At present, Qatar produces 77 million tons per year. Qatar’s withdrawal from OPEC is a good opportunity to increase its production from this shared filed, Iran is unable to attract more foreign technology and financial investment and Qatar’s oil production in South Pars is more than that of Iran.

According to Reuters in November, Australia grabbed the world’s biggest LNG exporter crown from Qatar in November. According to statistics, Australia produced 6.8 million tons of LNG in November, out of which 0.6 million tons were exported from Qatar.

Australia’s LNG exports rose by 19 percent in November compared to October while Qatar’s exports dropped 3 percent in November compared to the previous month, the country’s fourth consecutive decline for the year in exports.

It is not the first time that an OPEC member has withdrawn from the organization. The main point is that OPEC’s decisions are not followed by major oil suppliers and Qatar’s withdrawal is certainly not good for OPEC. As Qatar is not a major oil producer among OPEC members, it cannot cause any major changes in the oil price.

The major factor in the oil market is demand and supply. At present, the oil market is faced with oversupply which leads to a low oil price. Qatar’s withdrawal from OPEC is not a good sign for its future. If OPEC is interested in playing an important role in the world oil market, it needs cooperation and coherence among all members.

If major members continue to be inefficient in OPEC decision-making, there will not be a promising future for the organization. OPEC’s weak position favors major energy consumers. Obviously, OPEC does not have the same influence on oil prices as it used to be. Its strength has slowly weakened due to the growth of producers such as the United States and Russia.

 

https://news.cgtn.com

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